13 Nov 2017

Facebook Want To protect Your Nude Photos If You Send To Them

With "revenge p0rn attacks" infamously becoming popular by the day, social media giant Facebook is trying to protect your p0rn pictures from being shared on their social network if only you are willing to share the images with them.
Images that are shared with Facebook will be hashed to create a digital fingerprint which the company can use to I.D the same images if someone else tries to upload them. This also applies to Instagram and Messenger

The company says the photos won't be stored, but instead, a digital footprint would be created so that its image-matching technology can prevent any future uploading of a copy of the photograph.

Currently, Facebook is working with the Australian Office of the eSafety Commissioner to test the system in Australia.

Speaking to the press, government e-safety commissioner Julia Inman Grant said that one in five Australian women aged 18 - 45 and one in four indigenous Australians have been victims of revenge p0rn.

"It is really important that Facebook is taking this proactive leadership step. What we'are hearing from victims is that its not just the initial betrayal of trust, its the fear and anxiety that follows them after the image has been posted," she said.

 "This lets the victim take control and be proactive in their own safety, when so often the burden is on the victim to report to multiple platforms and trace where the image has been. Our vision is that these images could be taken down from every website simultaneously."

Facebook hopes to trial the scheme in the UK, US and Canada and  subsequently roll it out to other regions too.
With "revenge p0rn attacks" infamously becoming popular by the day, social media giant Facebook is trying to protect your p0rn pictures from being shared on their social network if only you are willing to share the images with them.
Images that are shared with Facebook will be hashed to create a digital fingerprint which the company can use to I.D the same images if someone else tries to upload them. This also applies to Instagram and Messenger

The company says the photos won't be stored, but instead, a digital footprint would be created so that its image-matching technology can prevent any future uploading of a copy of the photograph.

Currently, Facebook is working with the Australian Office of the eSafety Commissioner to test the system in Australia.

Speaking to the press, government e-safety commissioner Julia Inman Grant said that one in five Australian women aged 18 - 45 and one in four indigenous Australians have been victims of revenge p0rn.

"It is really important that Facebook is taking this proactive leadership step. What we'are hearing from victims is that its not just the initial betrayal of trust, its the fear and anxiety that follows them after the image has been posted," she said.

 "This lets the victim take control and be proactive in their own safety, when so often the burden is on the victim to report to multiple platforms and trace where the image has been. Our vision is that these images could be taken down from every website simultaneously."

Facebook hopes to trial the scheme in the UK, US and Canada and  subsequently roll it out to other regions too.

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